Online Epilepsy Awareness Training Courses – E-Learning Courses

Online Epilepsy Awareness Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited

Epilepsy Awareness Training - Online Training Courses - Mandatory Compliance UK -

Online Epilepsy Awareness Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited

Mandatory Compliance is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for healthcare and social care organisations. All our mandatory and statutory training programmes are externally peer-reviewed and accredited by the CPD Certification Service (CPDUK).

Epilepsy is the tendency to have recurrent seizures. This means that someone with epilepsy has had at least one seizure and is likely to have more. It is the most serious common neurological condition, which affects one in every 103 people in the UK. Epilepsy can affect anyone, at any age and from any walk of life.

These epilepsy awareness training courses are beneficial to those working with or responsible for the welfare and wellbeing of individuals with epilepsy. This course covers the best practice guidelines and ensures that those who complete it will have the abilities and expertise to provide a safe and effective environment for people with epilepsy.

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Online Epilepsy Awareness Training Courses - Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Online Epilepsy Awareness Training Courses with Certificates – CPDUK Accredited – Mandatory Compliance UK.

Here at Mandatory Compliance, we receive many questions about epilepsy awareness. We have provided answers to the most frequently asked questions about epilepsy awareness.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the FAQs about epilepsy awareness courses.

Epilepsy is a central nervous system (neurological) disorder in which brain activity becomes abnormal, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations, and sometimes loss of awareness. Anyone can develop epilepsy, regardless of age, gender, race and ethnic background.

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Epilepsy Awareness Courses – Online Training Courses

Epilepsy can start at any age, and there are many different types. Some types of epilepsy last for a limited time and the person eventually stops having seizures. But for many people, epilepsy is a life-long condition.

Electrical activity happens in our brain all the time. A seizure occurs when there is a sudden burst of intense electrical activity in the brain. As this causes a temporary disruption to the way the brain regularly works, the brain’s messages become mixed up. The result is an epileptic seizure.

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Epilepsy Awareness Course – Online Training Courses

There are many different types of seizures. What happens during a seizure depends on which part of the brain is affected and how far the seizure activity spreads. With some types of seizure, the person may remain alert and aware of what’s going on around them. However, other types may cause someone to lose awareness. 

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Epilepsy Awareness Course – Online Training Courses

Seizure signs and symptoms may include:

  • Temporary confusion
  • A staring spell
  • Uncontrollable jerking movements of the arms and legs
  • Loss of consciousness or awareness
  • Cognitive or emotional symptoms, such as fear, anxiety or deja vu.

Yes, epilepsy is one of the most common conditions affecting the brain.

Here are things you can do to help someone who is having this type of seizure:

  • Ease the person to the floor.
  • Turn the person gently onto one side. 
  • Clear the area around the person of anything hard or sharp.
  • Put something soft and flat, like a folded jacket, under his or her head.
  • Remove eyeglasses.

Epilepsy is one of the most common and severe neurological conditions in the world. It affects around 600,000 people in the UK. This means that almost 1 in 100 people have epilepsy, and approximately 87 people are diagnosed with epilepsy in the UK every day.

Most children of people with epilepsy do not develop seizures or epilepsy. However, it is possible since genes are passed down through families. If both parents have epilepsy, the risk is a bit greater. Most children will not inherit epilepsy from a parent, but the chance of inheriting some types of epilepsy is higher.

Different epilepsies are due to many different underlying causes. The causes can be complex, and sometimes hard to identify. A person might start having seizures because they have one or more of the following:

  • A genetic tendency passed down from one or both parents (inherited).
  • A genetic tendency that is not inherited, but is a new change in the person’s genes.
  • A structural (sometimes called ‘symptomatic’) change in the brain, such as the brain developing improperly, or damage caused by a brain injury, infections like meningitis, a stroke or a tumour. A brain scan, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), may show this.
  • Structural changes due to genetic conditions such as tuberous sclerosis, or neurofibromatosis, which can cause growths affecting the brain.

Messaging systems in the brain trigger every function in the human body. Epilepsy results when this system is disrupted due to faulty electrical activity. In many cases, the exact cause is unknown. Some people have inherited genetic factors that make epilepsy more likely to occur.

The primary treatment for epilepsy is called antiepileptic drugs or AEDs. The medicine does not cure epilepsy but helps to stop or reduce the number of seizures.

Many people find that their seizures stop with the first or second medicine they try. Some people need to try a few medications before they find one that works well for them; others need to take two or more epilepsy medicines together.

If epilepsy medicine does not work for someone, their doctor might suggest other types of treatment. 

A person with epilepsy can have more than one kind of seizure. Seizures are classified into two groups, including:

  • Generalised seizures, which affect both sides of the brain.
  • Focal seizures, which affect just one area of the brain. These seizures are called partial seizures.

Many kinds of health providers treat people with epilepsy. Primary care providers such as family physicians, paediatricians, and nurse practitioners are often the first people to see a person with epilepsy who has new seizures. These providers may make the diagnosis of epilepsy, or they may talk with a neurologist or epileptologist.

One or more genes may cause epilepsy. Yet, epilepsy may also be caused by the way some genes work in the brain.

Some young children may be born with a structural change in an area of the brain that gives rise to seizures. Further, about 3 out of 10 children with autism spectrum disorder may also have seizures.

The leading way for doctors to correctly diagnose epilepsy is by taking a detailed description of the seizures. They may also arrange for some tests to give them more information about the possible type and cause of epilepsy. Also, this can help rule out any other conditions that could be causing seizures.

 

These tests can include blood tests, an EEG (recording of the brainwaves) and a brain scan. However, there is not a single test that can prove if someone does or does not have epilepsy. 

New cases of epilepsy are most common in children, especially from birth to age 1. The rate of new cases of epilepsy gradually goes down until about age 10, and then stays about the same for teens and adults. The rate of new cases of epilepsy is also higher in people over age 55.

Triggers are situations that can bring on a seizure in some people with epilepsy. Some people’s seizures are brought on by certain situations.

Triggers can differ from person to person. Still, common triggers include tiredness and lack of sleep, stress, alcohol, and not taking medication.

Self-management is what you do to take care of yourself. You can learn how to manage seizures and keep an active and full life. Begin with these tips:

  • Take your medicine.
  • Talk with your doctor or nurse when you have questions.
  • Recognise seizure triggers, such as flashing or bright lights.
  • Keep a record of your seizures.
  • Get enough sleep.
  • Lower stress. 

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Epilepsy Awareness Courses – Online Training Courses

On completion of this course, learners should know and understand the following:

  • Define the meaning of epilepsy.
  • Outline the causes of epilepsy.
  • Recall the different types of seizures.
  • Know common seizure triggers.
  • Identify risks associated with epilepsy.
  • Provide first aid for an individual experiencing a seizure.
  • Understand what to consider when supporting an individual with epilepsy, including liaison with other professionals and an epilepsy care plan.

This course is for healthcare and social care workers who are involved with clients who have epilepsy. Learners will gain knowledge on the main effects of epilepsy and the importance of supporting service users to take medication as directed by their doctor. This course will also explore the different types of seizures and behaviour changes an individual may suffer as a result of epilepsy.

Also, it will improve your career prospects. Learn valuable knowledge, skills, advice and guidance to help you achieve success.

These are general steps to help someone who is having any type of seizure, such as:

  • Keep other people out of the way.
  • Clear hard or sharp objects away from the person.
  • Do not try to hold her down or stop the movements.
  • Place her on her side, to help keep her airway clear.
  • Look at your watch at the start of the seizure to time its length.
  • Do not put anything in her mouth.

Buccal midazolam is an emergency medication used to treat increased seizures in people with epilepsy. 

Our in-depth epilepsy awareness training course is beneficial for those working with or responsible for the wellbeing and welfare of individuals with epilepsy. The course looks at a variety of different seizures. 

The course will also explain what to do in the event of a seizure, in a variety of different environments and situations. It teaches the safe administration, storage and guidelines of buccal midazolam.

This epilepsy training is for anyone who wishes to gain an understanding of epilepsy, including social care staff, teachers and tutors in schools, colleges and universities, as well as employers and HR staff or colleagues of people with epilepsy.

It is also beneficial for friends of those with epilepsy who want to be able to recognise and learn how to deal with an epileptic seizure.

The benefits of taking this online epilepsy awareness course are as follows:

  • Increase your knowledge of epilepsy.
  • Improve your career prospects.
  • Learn valuable knowledge, skills, advice and guidance to help you achieve success.
  • Study online from anywhere.
  • Study at your own pace.

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Epilepsy Awareness Course – Online Training Courses

On successful completion of the Care Staff Courses will be able to download, save and/or print a quality assured continuing professional development (CPD) certificate. Our CPD certificates are recognised internationally and can be used to provide evidence for compliance and audit.

The CPD Certification Service (CPDUK) accredits all of our statutory and mandatory training courses as conforming to universally accepted Continuous Professional Development (CPD) guidelines.

Mandatory Compliance is distributed under the licence from The Mandatory Training Group – CPDUK Corporate Memebrship Number – 1117

Online Epilepsy Awareness - Online Training Courses - Mandatory Compliance UK-

Online Epilepsy Awareness Training Courses with Certificates - CPDUK Accredited - Mandatory Compliance UK.

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