Online Dementia Awareness Courses – Online Training Courses

Online Dementia Awareness Training Courses - CPDUK Accredited

Dementia Awareness Courses - Online Training Courses - Mandatory Compliance UK -

Online Dementia Awareness Training Courses - CPD Certified

Mandatory Compliance is the leading UK provider of accredited statutory and mandatory training courses for all sectors, including health and social care, education, local government, private and charity sectors. 

Dementia develops when the brain is damaged by diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease or a series of strokes. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, but not the only one. The specific symptoms that someone with dementia experiences will depend on the parts of the brain that are damaged and the disease that is causing dementia.

This comprehensive dementia awareness e-learning training courses intend to explain dementia, including its causes and symptoms, and the measures to diagnose and treat the condition. 

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Online Dementia Awareness Training Courses - Frequently Ask Questions and Answers

Online Dementia Awareness Training Courses – E-Learning Courses with Certificates – CPDUK Accredited – Mandatory Compliance UK. 

Here at Mandatory Compliance, we receive many questions about dementia. We have provided answers to the most frequently asked questions about dementia.

Click on the text below to see the answers to the Frequently Ask Questions about dementia.

Dementia is an overall term for diseases and conditions characterised by a decline in memory, language, problem-solving and other thinking skills that affect a person’s ability to perform everyday activities.

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Dementia Awareness Training – Online Training Course – CPD Accredited

Dementia describes a group of symptoms affecting memory, thinking and social abilities severely enough to interfere with your daily life. Though dementia generally involves memory loss, memory loss has different causes. Having memory loss alone does not mean you have dementia.

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Dementia Awareness Training – Online Training Course – CPD Accredited

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. Not all causes of Alzheimer’s disease are known. However,  experts do know that a small percentage can relate to mutations of these genes, passing down from a parent to a child.

The typical progression of dementia disease may be broken down into five stages:

  • Stage One: No Impairment. 
  • Stage Two: Very Mild Cognitive Decline. 
  • Stage Three: Mild Cognitive Decline. 
  • Stage Four: Moderate Cognitive Decline. 
  • Stage Five: Mid-Stage Dementia.

Mandatory Compliance offers a wide range of health and safety training courses for healthcare and social care providers, including sector-specific e-learning bundles, train the trainer courses and professionally developed trainer materials and resources.

Click here for Dementia Awareness Training – Online Training Course – CPD Accredited

There is no one test to determine if someone has dementia. Doctors diagnose Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia based on a careful medical history, a physical examination, laboratory tests, and the characteristic changes in thinking, day-to-day function and behaviour associated with each type.

There is no certain way to prevent all types of dementia. Researchers are still investigating how the disease develops. However, there is good evidence that a healthy lifestyle can help reduce your risk of developing dementia when you are older.

Dementia is more common in people over the age of 65, but it can also affect younger people. Early-onset of the disease can begin when people are in their 30s, 40s, or 50s. With treatment and early diagnosis, you can slow the progression of the disease and maintain mental function.

The exact symptoms experienced by a person with dementia depend on the areas of the brain that are damaged by disease-causing dementia. With many types of dementia, some of the nerve cells in the brain stop working, losing connections with other cells and die. Dementia is usually progressive.

Scientists have warned that too much stress in life can ultimately lead to depression and dementia. A major review suggests that chronic stress and anxiety can damage areas of the brain involved in emotional responses, thinking and memory, leading to depression and even Alzheimer’s disease.

Every person is different, and dementia manifests itself uniquely. The speed at which dementia progresses varies widely. On average, a person with Alzheimer’s disease lives 4 to 8 years after diagnosis, while some can live for 20 years.

Mental ability tests help the diagnosis of dementia. These tests are known as cognitive assessments and may be done initially by a GP. There are several different tests, but the most common method used by GPs is the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG).

A person with dementia feels confused more and more often. When they cannot make sense of the world or get something wrong, they may feel frustrated and angry with themselves. They may get angry or upset with other people very quickly.

The answer to the hereditary question is not specified. Certain genes can directly cause or increase the risk of dementia, but in some circumstances, these are usually rare.

Certain foods can help fight dementia; these include:

  • Raw leafy greens. Darker greens, such as spinach, kale and romaine, have more brain-boosting antioxidants and vitamin K
  • Cruciferous vegetables
  • Blueberries
  • Beans
  • Nuts
  • Fish
  • Whole grains
  • Poultry.

A person may die from an infection like aspiration pneumonia, which occurs as a result of swallowing difficulties, or a person may die from a blood clot in the lung as a result of being immobile and bedbound. However, it is essential to note that dementia is fatal.

End-stage or late-stage dementia may last from several weeks to several years. As the disease advances, your loved one’s abilities become severely limited, and their needs increase.

Dementia occurs due to physical changes in the brain and is a progressive disease, meaning it gets worse over time. For some people, dementia progresses rapidly, while it takes years to reach an advanced stage for others. The progression of dementia depends significantly on the underlying cause of dementia.

The two most common causes of death were bronchopneumonia (38.4%), and ischaemic heart disease (23.1%), while neoplastic diseases were uncommon (3.8%).

Becoming a specialist dementia nurse requires additional post-registration training in the condition. The nurse should have at least two years of practice experience in dementia care. Usually, people working as a specialist dementia nurse will also hold a registered mental health nursing qualification.

A brain scan using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is generally included in the standard evaluation for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. These scans can show the loss of brain mass associated with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

There are treatments to help ease the symptoms of dementia. The two most commonly prescribed medicines for dementia are cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine (Namenda). Doctors use them to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common kind of dementia.

Primary doctors, a neurologist or a geriatrician, will review the medical history and symptoms, which includes conducting several tests to examine the patient.

Dementia is more common in people over the age of 65, but it can also affect younger people. Early-onset of the disease can begin when people are in their 30s, 40s, or 50s. With treatment and early diagnosis, you can slow the progression of the disease and maintain mental function.

Common signs and symptoms include acting out one’s dreams in sleep, seeing things that are not there (visual hallucinations), and problems with focus and attention. Other signs include uncoordinated or slow movement, tremors, and rigidity or parkinsonism.

Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) is one form of non-pharmacological intervention used to support people with mild to moderate dementia. During CST, the person with dementia is invited to participate in therapeutic sessions with a trained practitioner, skilled in interpersonal communication and dementia care.

You can follow the steps to communicate better with a patient who has dementia:

  • Set a positive mood for interaction
  • Get the person’s attention
  • State your message clearly
  • Ask simple, answerable questions
  • Listen with your ears, eyes, and heart
  • Break down activities into a series of steps 
  • When the going gets tough, distract and redirect.

A diagnosis of dementia does not automatically mean that a person is incapable of living alone. Some people can live on their own for some time after the diagnosis. However, others may be at too much risk to continue living alone.

It is possible that many people have been diagnosed with dementia, but are not aware of their diagnosis. However, early intervention and diagnosis will help the person to comprehend what is going on. As the disease progresses, this may change.

A person with dementia feels confused more and more often. When they cannot make sense of the world or get something wrong, they may feel frustrated and angry with themselves. People with dementia can feel nice feelings as well, such as being happy and calm.

Getting a diagnosis of dementia while still of working age can be challenging. You may still want or need to continue working, whether it is for financial reasons or because you enjoy it. In most cases, it will not be necessary to give up your job immediately.

Visual hallucinations can be as simple as seeing flashing lights. They can also be complex, such as seeing animals, people or strange situations. Less often in people with dementia, hallucinations can involve hearing, smelling, tasting or feeling things that do not exist.

A mental health condition is considered a disability if it has a long-term effect on your normal day-to-day activity. There are many different types of mental health conditions which can lead to a disability, including dementia and depression.

Dementia occurs due to physical changes in the brain and is a progressive disease, meaning it gets worse over time. For some people, dementia progresses rapidly, while it takes years to reach an advanced stage for others.

Calmly reassuring and giving cues to orient the person who has dementia is helpful in the evening. Try to keep the person going to bed at the same time every night. Calm activities at the end of the day and before bedtime may help the person with dementia sleep better at night.

The Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination (SAGE) is an online test that helps to detect the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Developed by researchers at Ohio State University, the test is designed to be done at home and then taken to a physician for a more formal evaluation.

In dementia, its progress is usually slow. The average person lives 4 to 8 years after receiving the diagnosis. Some people may live for 20 years after their diagnosis.

As well as progressive brain cell death, like that seen in Alzheimer’s disease, dementia can be caused by a head injury, a stroke, or a brain tumour.

Early intervention can help reverse dementia. Also, it is essential to consider all the factors which affect brain function, such as diet, exercise, stress, nutritional deficiencies, toxins, hormonal imbalances, and inflammation.

People with symptoms of dementia are given tests to check their mental abilities, such as memory or thinking. These tests are known as cognitive assessments and may be done initially by a GP.

On successful completion of the Dementai Awareness Courses will be able to download, save and/or print a quality assured continuing professional development (CPD) certificate. Our CPD certificates are recognised internationally and can be used to provide evidence for compliance and audit.

The CPD Certification Service (CPDUK) accredits all of our statutory and mandatory training courses as conforming to universally accepted Continuous Professional Development (CPD) guidelines.

Mandatory Compliance is distributed under the licence from The Mandatory Training Group – CPDUK Corporate Memebrship Number – 1117

Online Dementia - Online Training Courses - Mandatory Compliance UK-

Online Dementia Awareness Training Courses with Certificates - CPD Certified - Mandatory Compliance UK.

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