Draft – FREE COVID-19 Training – Free Coronavirus Awareness Online Course

FREE COVID-19 Training - Free Coronavirus Awareness Online Course

Free Coronavirus Awareness Courses - Online Training Courses -Mandatory Compliance UK -

Free Coronavirus Awareness Training - Online Course

Mandatory Compliance is a leading UK provider of accredited online training courses for health and social care professionals and organisations that are approved by the CPD Certification Service (CPDUK), Training Qualifications UK (TQUK), RoSPA, IATP, IFE, IIRSM and Gatehouse Awards.

Despite medical advancements and improved medical practices, everyone is still susceptible to contracting infectious disease outbreaks.Covid-19 is a severe threat to public health and safety, since it is highly contagious and can be fatal. We want raise awareness about the exact cause and effect, signs and symptoms, and preventive measures for health professionals, the wider community as well as the government’s preparedness and response to this global crisis.

Register by filling the form below for a Free Coronavirus Awareness Training course. Once you successfully complete your online assessments, please follow the instructions to download your certificate.

To get a FREE online course, fill in the form now!

Free Coronavirus Awareness Training: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Free Coronavirus Awareness Training. A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

Click here for online training courses that can help reduse risk spreading coronavirus or COVID-19.

On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for the disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

There are many types of human coronaviruses, including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been foreseen in humans named following the World Health Organisation (WHO).

The UK Chief Medical Officers have raised the risk to the public from low to moderate.

Health professionals are working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have coronavirus.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people, and others, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that affect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people. 

This is suspected of having occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people.

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 spreads can help stop the stigma.

This virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person. It is important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some illnesses are highly contagious (like measles), while other infections are less so.

The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading quickly and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in a field, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why the CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

  • The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
  • The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been revealed, to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the infectious disease, which is the period during which people have developed the illness after exposure. 

For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of disclosure, because 14 days is the most extended incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. 

Before preparing or eating food, it is essential to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day, wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the primary way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely a shallow risk of spread from food products—also, packages that are shipped for days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

The virus can cause pneumonia. Those who have fallen ill are reported to suffer coughs, fever and breathing difficulties. In severe cases, there can be organ failure. As this is viral pneumonia, antibiotics are of no use. The antiviral drugs we have against flu will not work. Recovery depends on the strength of the immune system. Many of those who have died were already in poor health.

In the UK, the medical advice is that if you have recently travelled from areas affected by a coronavirus, you should:

  • Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people as you would with the flu.
  • Call NHS 111 to inform them of your recent travel to the area.

China’s national health commission has confirmed human-to-human transmission, and there have been such transmissions elsewhere.

There is still a lot that is unknown about the newly emerged COVID-19 and how it spreads. Two other coronaviruses have developed previously to cause severe illness in people (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV). The virus that causes COVID-19 is more genetically related to SARS-CoV than MERS-CoV, but both are beta coronaviruses with their origins in bats. While we don’t know for sure that this virus will behave the same way as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, we can use the information gained from both of these earlier coronaviruses to guide us. In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely a slight risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over days or weeks at ambient temperatures. 

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods, and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods. Information will be provided on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website as it becomes available.

Call your healthcare professional if you feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, or if you live in or have recently travelled from an area with the ongoing spread of COVID-19.

Your healthcare professional will work with your state’s public health department and CDC to determine if you need to be tested for COVID-19.

The symptoms of coronavirus are:

  • a cough
  • a high temperature
  • shortness of breath
  • But these symptoms do not necessarily mean you have the illness.

The symptoms are similar to other illnesses that are much more common, such as cold and flu.

Most people can continue to go to work, school and other public places.

You only need to stay away from public places (self-isolate) if advised to by the 111 online coronavirus service or a medical professional.

Follow the necessary procedures to avoid catching or spreading coronavirus:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • Always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • Put used tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards
  • Try to avoid close contact with unwell people.

If there is a chance you could have coronavirus, you may be asked to stay away from other people (self-isolate). 

This means you should:

  • Stay at home
  • Not going to work, school or public places
  • Not use public transport or taxis
  • Ask friends, family members or delivery services to do errands for you
  • Try to avoid visitors to your home – it’s OK for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food

You may need to do this for up to 14 days to help reduce the possible spread of infection.

There is currently no specific treatment for coronavirus. Antibiotics do not help, as they do not work against viruses.

Treatment aims to relieve the symptoms while your body fights the illness. You’ll need to stay in isolation away from other people until you’ve recovered.

Health professionals are working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have coronavirus.

If you think you have been in close contact with someone with confirmed coronavirus, use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do.

You do not necessarily need to stay away from work or school if someone you live with has recently come from a country or area with a high coronavirus risk.

Use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do.

Wash your hands more often than usual, for 20 seconds and whenever you:

  • get home or into work
  • blow your nose, sneeze or cough
  • eat or handle food

It is important to use soap and water or a hand sanitiser.

Face masks play a critical role in places like hospitals, but there is very little evidence of widespread benefit for members of the public.

Most people can continue to go to work, school and other public places.

You only need to stay away from public places (self-isolate) if advised to by the NHS 111 online coronavirus service or a medical professional.

There is currently no evidence that you can catch coronavirus from food.

But it is always a good idea to wash your hands in soap and water or use hand sanitiser gel before you prepare or eat food.

The best thing is regular and thorough hand washing, preferably with soap and water.

Coronavirus spreads when an infected person coughs small droplets – packed with the virus – into the air. These can be breathed in, or cause an infection if you touch a surface they have landed on then your eyes, nose or mouth.

So, coughing and sneezing into tissues, not touching your face with unwashed hands, and avoiding close contact with infected people are essential for limiting the spread.

Face masks do not provide sufficient protection, according to medical experts.

The proportion dying from the disease appears low (between 1% and 2%) – but the figures are unreliable.

Thousands being treated but may go on to die – so the death rate could be higher. But it may also be lower if lots of mild cases are unreported.

A World Health Organisation examination of data from 56,000 patients suggests:

6% become critically ill – lung failure, septic shock, organ failure and risk of death

14% develop severe symptoms – difficulty breathing and shortness of breath

80% develop mild symptoms – fever and cough and some may have pneumonia.

If you need testing in the UK, you may have to give samples of mucus, blood or faeces. These will be tested, and results may be available on the same day.

While you await your test results, you may be asked to stay at home and self-isolate.

Hundreds of new cases are being reported worldwide each day. However, it is thought health agencies may be unaware of many cases.

After starting in China, coronavirus is now spreading fast in countries like South Korea, Italy and Iran.

Online Autism Training Courses - Mandatory Compliance UK -

FREE Coronavirus Awareness Training - Free E-Learning Course - Mandatory Compliance UK.

%d bloggers like this: