Does YOUR child have a mental health problem?

Does YOUR child have a mental health problem?

Does YOUR child have a mental health problem?

Does YOUR child have a mental health problem? Psychotherapist reveals the VERY subtle signs that show they could be heading for a breakdown.

  • Psychotherapist  has developed a quiz to tell whether your child is struggling
  • Susan Hepburn has over thirty years’ experience treating children 
  • Eating habits and interaction with social media can point to issues  
  • At the end of the quiz, you will get a score between 0 and 40 and advice on whether to seek further action 

Most parents may think they would notice if their child was suffering with mental health issues, but as one psychotherapist points out, the signs can be very subtle.

With 50 per cent of mental health problems established by the tender age of 14, psychotherapist to the stars, Susan Hepburn, believes that it is vital that parents are aware of the hidden signs and symptoms that their child is suffering.

According to the latest statistics, ten per cent of children and adolescents aged 5-16 years currently have a clinically diagnosable mental health problem, yet 70 per cent of these young people do not receive appropriate interventions at an early stage.

Susan says: ‘Children suffer mental health problems as a direct response to what is happening in their lives and too often, kids are expected to ‘grow out’ of their emotional problems.

‘But if you suspect signs of mental health illness such as ADHD, extremes or peculiarity of behaviour or depression in children, it’s important to seek help from an expert in child psychology.’

Hepburn adds: ‘Social media addiction, body image issues and exam pressures are frequent factors contributing to the poor mental health of children and young people’ and have become more commonplace these days.’

Scroll down to take the quiz…

Does YOUR child have a mental health problem? Psychotherapist reveals the VERY subtle signs that show they could be heading for a breakdown.Psychotherapist Susan Hepburn has developed a quiz on how to tell whether your child is suffering from mental health problems 

Mental health issues are more likely to develop into a more debilitating condition if left untreated. That’s why it is important to deal with any issues as soon as possible.

Hepburn has developed a simple quiz that will help you determine whether there is a cause for concern.

QUIZ

Sleeping habits: My child’s sleeping habits have become notably disturbed. They are experiencing periods of insomnia, have constant waking’s or need to sleep excessively (over 11 hours per night). Bed wetting may also be an issue.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Mood: There has been an apparent change in their mood which is consistently low or fluctuates drastically between a depressive state and elation or happiness. They may struggle to concentrate on tasks or lash out unpredictably.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Eating habits: Erratic eating, a lack of appetite or excessive consumption has become a significant issue for my child. There has been a notable rise or drop in their weight, eating habits have changed and they cover up in baggy clothes. Self-confidence is related undoubtedly to the success of their weight goals.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Gaming and social media: My child spends far more time on games, social media or interacting with their phone or tablet than they do with family and friends. They struggle to maintain close friendships or seem immensely distracted or disinterested in personal communication and instead choose to lock themselves into their rooms.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Does YOUR child have a mental health problem? Psychotherapist reveals the VERY subtle signs that show they could be heading for a breakdown.Hepburn says that addiction to social media and gaming cane be a warning sign that something is seriously wrong

Anxiety: My child is notably uptight and excessively worried. They have unexpected panic attacks about perceived issues or feel agitated carrying out basic or social tasks. They may struggle to make decisions or be reluctant to leave the house.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Desire for attention: My child shies away from attention and has little wish to communication or tries to consume attention at the expense of those around them. They show little consideration for the needs or requirements of others.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Addictive or obsessive behaviour: Repetitive or excessive activities are impacting badly on daily functions.

These could range from obsessions with food, eating, drugs, alcohol or other.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Perfectionism and self-criticism: My child is excessively over-critical about their physical appearance, mental ability or other aspects of their lives. They focus on flaws and are visibly distressed or grossly disappointed in themselves for any deviation from their desired path. This really interferes with their daily life.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Bullying: There has been a marked change in attitude towards peers, friends and classmates or social isolation has been a long-term issue. Their self-confidence is incredibly low, or my child has expressed the belief that they are worthless or unlikeable despite my assurances.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

Loss of a loved one or separation: Your child has experienced a traumatic life event – such as a death of a loved one or a divorce or separation of a family. This has resulted in a notable change in behaviour including withdrawal, anger or extreme sadness.

  • Almost all the time (4)
  • Sometimes (3)
  • Rarely (2)
  • Never (0)

THE RESULTS…

Less than 10 – You child may be experiencing worries that are causing issues, but these could be part of the ups and downs of daily life. You should keep a close eye on the situation and escalate further if these behaviours persist or intensify. In particular, if you have answered a 4 rating for two or more answers you must monitor these specific behaviours closely.

11-20 – You child may be experiencing a notable issue. Gently talk to them and consider whether there are other problems under the surface. Seek further advice if more symptoms begin to show or if existing symptoms intensify.

21- 30 – Seek more information about issues that may be impacting significantly on your child’s health. Talking gently but indirectly to your child about how they are feeling is important. Professional help from your GP or a professional is recommended.

31 – 40 – These is a significant likelihood your child is struggling with a mental health issue that needs treatment. It is recommended that you urgently get a second opinion from a professional – preferably a GP, a counsellor, physician or a psychologist.

How you talk to your child about your mental health condition (if you have one of course) will depend on the age and maturity of your child and your willingness to open up to him or her.

Before proceeding, you should always talk to your doctor or therapist about the best ways to bring this information up. You may want to consider the possibility of inviting a child to a session to explore this information.

Creative Commons Disclosure

This news article was published by Martha Cliff in Mail Online. Click here to view the original article.

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Does YOUR child have a mental health problem?

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